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PLACES TO VISIT

All PLACES TO VISIT

Places to visit in Newcastle upon Tyne, our ultimate guide to where to go in Newcastle.   Plan your sightseeing in the North East’s most famous city with ease with handy reviews, information and directions. We have everything here in one place.

You can keep up to date with our handy blog on everything that’s on in Newcastle and take advantage of our great offers.

  • O2 Academy Newcastle

    O2 Academy Newcastle   O2 Academy Newcastle is one of the North East’s Premier live music venues.   A beautiful & historic building which boasts a magnificent 2000 capacity auditorium plus a 380 capacity intimate 2nd space. A dramatic and atmospheric place to experience some of the biggest names in music. The venue also hosts two of the country’s biggest and most renowned club nights each and every week:   DIRTY POP – EVERY FRIDAY Newcastle’s Biggest Student Night   PROJEKT – EVERY SATURDAY Newcastle’s biggest Saturday party! #LetsGoDancing 11:00pm – 3.00am   Public Transit Nearest Metro stations are Central Station (2 minute walk) and Monument (5 minute walk). Useful travel information available here: http://www.o2academynewcastle.co.uk/venue.php   To find out What’s On at the 02 Academy Newcastle click here.          

  • Metro Radio Arena

    Metro Radio Arena The Metro Radio Arena Newcastle is the largest concert and exhibition venue in the North East of England and is capable of supporting the very best in entertainment. Their superb 40,000sq metre site can support concerts with over 11,000 seats and host everything from weddings to Lady Gaga! You can view a full list of What’s On at the Metro Radio Arena here. General Enquiries: 0844 493 4567  Tickets: 0844 493 6666 Group Bookings: 0191 260 6006 The Metro Radio Arena has a strong commitment to the North East as a region and prides itself on employing local staff within its venues who know the area and its people, and also using local suppliers. How to get there by Car or Coach The Metro Radio Arena Newcastle is only 3 minutes from the A1 North – South route. Take the A184 signposted ‘City Centre’, then follow the A189 over the Redheugh Bridge.  When in the vicinity of the Arena, follow the signs to the appropriate car parks. Our full address for your sat nav is – Metro Radio Arena, Arena Way, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE4 7NA Public Transport Many local bus services, Tyne& Wear Metro and rail services stop at Central Station, which is only around a 5 minute walk away from the Arena. Buses from Hexham, Stanley, Consett and many parts of Gateshead and Newcastle all stop at Central Station. Eldon Square and Haymarket Bus Stations are around a 10 minute walk from Newcastle Arena. Public Transport information can be found at www.nexus.org.uk or by calling Traveline on 0871 200 2233. Arena Event Car Parking There are over 600 convenient Official Car Park spaces available on site at the rear of the building that offer; CCTV cameras Regular security patrols Alternatively, when our Car Park is full, we recommend using the NCP Car Park located next to the Arena, with its entrance on Redheugh Bridge Road. You may be able to book your car park place when you purchase your event tickets; we have a limited number of discounted spaces available saving £1 on the usual fee, available for certain concerts. Cars with wheelchair patrons can park at the Arena subject to availability on a first come first served basis. Pre-booking is not available. Dropping Off & Picking Up Dropping off can be made along Railway Street. You are advised to collect people from an area away from the Arena as it is likely that you will become involved in heavy traffic. For many shows the road at the front of the building, Redheugh Bridge Road, will be closed for pedestrian safety and approach should be made via Pottery Lane from the east, or up Shot Factory Lane from Skinnerburn Road next to the river. Taxis Taxis can pick up on Railway Street/Arena Way before and after events. There is also a taxi rank at Central Station.    

  • City Hall, Newcastle

    City Hall  Newcastle City Hall is a concert hall located in Newcastle upon Tyne.  It has hosted many popular music and classical artists throughout the years, as well as standup and comedy acts. Opened in 1927, the City Hall has become a venue for orchestras, rock and pop bands, and comedy acts, as well as for celebrity recitals, talks and civic functions.   For updates on entertainment and what’s on in the North East subscribe to our handy blog.  

  • Theatre Royal Newcastle

    Theatre Royal Newcastle Newcastle Theatre Royal is the leading theatre in the North East.   Every year they present over 400 performances to over 300,000 people, and host the region’s favourite pantomime.  Showcasing some of the finest drama, the brightest West End musicals, the cream of the comedy circuit, award winning ballet and dance, family friendly shows, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre, Opera North and Rambert Dance. Easily accessible from Monument Metro it is a popular venue and part of the beautiful, a picturesque and photogenic Grey Street. Granted its Royal licence by King George III, the Theatre Royal Newcastle opened on Drury Lane off Mosley Street in 1788 and soon established itself as one of England’s leading theatres. Three months before Queen Victoria ascended the throne, in February 1837, the Theatre moved to Grey Street, a flagship building in Grainger and Dobson’s famous city plan.  It features what is generally regarded as the finest Theatre façade in the UK, later combined with a fine 1901 auditorium by one of the great Theatre architects, Frank Matcham after the original interior had been destroyed by fire in 1899. Over the centuries, many of the great names of the English stage have played at the Royal, from Keane to Irving, Olivier to Dench and the Hollywood greats Orson Welles, Charlton Heston and Jack Lemmon have also trodden the famous boards.  In 2009 the modern great Sir Ian McKellen described the Theatre Royal Newcastle as his favourite theatre. The Grade I Listed Theatre today is both neo-classical monument and cultural engine, with an annual audience of 337,000 and over 400 performances each year.  The third home of the Royal Shakespeare Company, alongside Stratford-upon-Avon and London, its programme is rich and varied featuring world-class drama, including National Theatre productions, an Opera North Season, and a rich array of contemporary dance, musicals and comedy. For updates on entertainment and what’s on in the North East subscribe to our handy blog.

  • Tyne Theatre & Opera House

    Tyne Theatre & Opera House Tyne Theatre & Opera House offers the best in Music, Comedy and Theatre and is run by the Preservation Trust’s subsidiary, Tyne Theatre and Opera House Ltd.  It is a social hub of entertainment, hosting variety performances, comedy, ballet, musicals and live concerts. Opened in 1867, the Theatre itself is a Grade 1 listed theatre rated in the top 4% of listed buildings by English Heritage and has been afforded a the three star rating, the highest available, by the Theatres Trust, branded as “a very fine theatre of the highest theatrical and architectural quality“. The importance of the architectural and theatrical heritage of the building is also recognised by The Association of Historic Theatres in Europe and OISTAT (the International Organisation of Scenographers, Theatre Technicians and Architects).  Tyne Theatre and Opera House Preservation Trust became the freehold owner of the building in 2008. Located in the centre of Newcastle, Tyne Theatre & Opera House is easily accessible by the city’s varied public transport systems.  There is a choice of off-street parking nearby and a wealth of restaurants, shops, hotels and local amenities.   For updates on entertainment and what’s on in the North East subscribe to our handy blog.    

  • Gateshead Millenium Bridge

    Gateshead Millenium Bridge One of the Quayside’s main features is the pedestrian Gateshead Millennium Bridge, opened in 2001, which spans the river between the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art and the Newcastle Law Courts.  The Millennium Bridge is a pedestrian and cyclist tilt bridge.   The award-winning structure was conceived and designed by architect Wilkinson Eyre and structural engineer Gifford.  It is sometimes referred to as the ‘Blinking Eye Bridge’ or the ‘Winking Eye Bridge’ due to its shape and its tilting method.   Tilt times for the bridge are displayed both on the bridge itself, and also on a page on the Gateshead Council website.  

  • Tyne Bridge

    Tyne Bridge This iconic landmark is a must see for anyone visiting Newcastle.   The Tyne Bridge is a through arch bridge over the River Tyne in North East England, linking Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead.  The bridge was officially opened by King George V on the 10th October 1928 and has become a defining symbol of the region.  The Tyne Bridge was designed by the engineering firm Mott, Hay and Anderson and was built by Dorman Long and Co. of Middlesbrough who later went on to build Sydney Harbour Bridge, which opened three years later in 1932.  The Tyne Bridge is probably most recognised for the annual Great North Run, as 52,000 runners pass over the bridge accompanied by a display from the Red Arrows.  

  • The Angel of the North

    The Angel of the North The Angel of the North is an iconic landmark of the North East.  This 20 metres (66 ft) tall contemporary sculpture was designed by Antony Gormley.  The wings extend  54 metres (177 ft) across, almost as wide as a Boeing 747, and curve slightly inwards to give “a sense of embrace”. It is one of the most viewed pieces of art in the world, seen by more than one person every second, 90,000 every day or 33 million every year! The significance of an Angel was to show that beneath the site of its construction, coal miners worked for two centuries and grasp the transition from an industrial to an information age.  The Angel of the North has become one of the most talked about pieces of public art ever produced. Located near Gateshead, it stands on a hill just to the north of Birtley, overlooking the A1 and A167 roads, work began on the project in 1994 at a cost of £800,000, with most of the funding provided by the National Lottery.  The Angel was finished on 16th February 1998. The Angel of the North was voted 2nd favourite UK landmark when The Independent ‘Traveller‘ and BA’s ‘High Life‘ magazine asked readers to help select 21 icons that define 21-century Britain. The Angel of the North has also been voted the UK’s best loved roadside landmark in a survey by National Express.

  • Monument

    Grey’s Monument Grey’s Monument was erected in 1838 to honor the 2nd Earl Grey for the passing of the Great Reform Act of 1832.  It consists of a statue of Lord Grey standing atop a 130 foot (40 m) high column.   The wide base of the monument is a popular spot for people watching and often acts as a venue for buskers, religious speakers and political activists.  Seasonal markets often take place in the surrounding area and a large outdoor cinema screen is occasionally there in the summer. Monument Metro station is located directly underneath, for a timetable click here. The Monument Mall Shopping Centre is located adjacent on Blackett Street. The surrounding area is simply known locally as “Monument”.  

  • Newcastle Castle

    Newcastle Castle  Newcastle’s Castle Keep and Black Gate have reunited as a combined visitor attraction.  Newcastle Castle is where the city forged its development, identity and significance in British history. Consisting of two buildings, the Castle Keep and Black Gate miraculously survive and are open to the pubic following a Heritage Lottery funded refurbishment. Visitors can uncover the changing face of the Castle through the ages: from royal fortress and border stronghold to grim dungeon and teeming slum.   New exhibits allow visitors to experience what life would have been like for inhabitants in two of North East England’s most fascinating historic buildings. Newcastle’s most historic buildings, the Castle Keep and its 13th century gatehouse the Black Gate, were once part of a much larger fortress.  Given its tumultuous history, it is miraculous that so much of Newcastle’s castle has survived intact. Today you can explore the ancient passageways and chambers where Kings walked and villains were imprisoned. Find the marks left by the inhabitants through the ages and learn the fascinating story of the Castle Garth community which grew up around the ruins.  The two buildings that remain were cut off from each other by the Victorian railways of the 19th century – an unfortunate side effect of the North East’s trailblazing role in the Industrial Revolution. Exhibits guide visitors through the Castle’s history over the years: from settlement in Roman times, to medieval stronghold, use as a modern day museum and everything in between. Simply purchase your ticket from the Castle’s all-new Black Gate reception to begin your journey.

  • St.Nicholas Tower

    Newcastle Cathedral The Cathedral Church of St Nicholas is a Church of England cathedral in Newcastle upon Tyne. The Cathedral Church of St. Nicholas is one of the most beautiful and historic buildings in Newcastle.  The spire has dominated Newcastle’s skyline and served as a prominent landmark and navigation point for ships in the River Tyne for over 500 years. The cathedral is named after St Nicholas, the patron saint of sailors and boats. Most of the cathedral’s features date from the 14th and 15th centuries, although the earliest surviving fragment is Norman. You are warmly invited to visit the Cathedral – whether you wish to join in for worship, or are seeking some space for peace and quiet, or are interested in exploring the Cathedral’s treasures of monuments, ledger stones (one of the largest collections in Western Europe) and stained glass. The Cathedral is open Sunday to Friday from 7.30am until 6.30pm, and on Saturdays and Bank Holidays from 8.30am until 4.00pm. There is no charge for entry – although donations are requested. Times of daily services are available on their website: http://stnicholascathedral.co.uk/events-and-services/. Occasionally we are closed for special events. This information can also be found on our website. The Cathedral has disabled access and is a registered Safe Place. As you enter the Cathedral through one of the doors under the Lantern Tower you will see the Welcome Desk.  On this desk are various leaflets and booklets about the Cathedral, about events taking place here and about the Christian faith. These include a free Welcome leaflet which includes a suggested route to explore the Cathedral and some of its treasures. The Cathedral’s Lantern Café is open from 8.30am to 3.30pm Monday to Friday and serves lunches, light bites, home-made cakes, teas and coffees.      

  • Grey Street

    Grey Street Grey Street is a must see for visitors to Newcastle, a picturesque and photogenic street it has been described as one of the finest streets in England.   The centre piece of Richard Grainger and John Dobson’s ambitious plans for a new town centre in the 1830s. In 1862, Prime Minister, William Gladstone described it as “our best modern street”. In 1948, the poet John Betjeman declared: “As for the curve of Grey Street, I shall never forget seeing it to perfection, traffic-less on a misty Sunday morning. Not even old Regent Street London can compare with that descending subtle curve.” The street curves down from Grey’s Monument towards the valley of the River Tyne and was voted England’s finest street in 2005 in a survey of BBC Radio 4 listeners. In the Google Street View awards of 2010, Grey Street came 3rd in the British picturesque category. Grey Street’s most famous address is probably the Theatre Royal which was completed in 1838. Grey Street provided the backdrop to Transformers: The Last Knight, showcasing it’s photogenic appeal and claim as one of the best looking streets in Britain. It also played host to some of the world’s finest cars as part of the NE1 Newcastle Motor Show.

  • The Quayside

    The Quayside The Quayside is the area along the banks of the River Tyne, with Newcastle north of the river and Gateshead to the south.  The area was once a busy industrial and commercial dockside serving the city.  In recent years the area has been heavily redeveloped to provide an environment for the modern arts, music and culture.   The Gateshead side of the river is now referred to as the Gateshead Quays and is the site of both the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art and The Sage Gateshead performing arts and conference centre.  The iconic Tyne Bridge is known throughout the world, linking Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead.  There are actually ten bridges connecting the two.  The Tyne Bridge, relatively new Millennium footbridge, the Swing Bridge, the High Level Bridge, the Queen Elizabeth Bridge, the King Edward rail bridge, the Redheugh Bridge, Scotswood Bridge, the A1 western bypass, and the Newburn Bridge. One of the Quayside’s main features is the pedestrian Gateshead Millennium Bridge, opened in 2001, which spans the river between the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art and the Newcastle Law Courts.  The Millennium Bridge is a pedestrian and cyclist tilt bridge.  The award-winning structure was conceived and designed by architect Wilkinson Eyre and structural engineer Gifford.  It is sometimes referred to as the ‘Blinking Eye Bridge‘ or the ‘Winking Eye Bridge‘ due to its shape and its tilting method.  The Newcastle side also hosted a regular street market, they still have a market there on every Sunday including Easter Sunday, Newcastle Quayside. Newcastle’s iconic quayside is one of the most popular areas to party with an array of bars, clubs and restaurants to choose from.  Guaranteed a good night you can pick and choose your venues as you bar crawl from one to another.  The easiest way to get there is to walk down Dean Street and keep going till you get to the river!  It might seem like a bit of a hike at first but it is all downhill and once there the quayside has everything you need in one place with something for everyone.   If all that walking has worked up a hunger the Hop & Cleaver is a great place to grab a bite and a pint, before moving on to the clubs for cocktails and partying like a Geordie!  If walking isn’t your thing there is an excellent bus service called the Quaylink.   There are some excellent cocktail bars and clubs along the waterfront with Sandhill just by the swing bridge having some of the best in town.  You can find them listed on our handy guide here.   If you head in the opposite direction you will find some relaxed quayside bars such as The Head of Steam Quayside and Pitcher & Piano, with great views of the river and iconic Tyne and Millennium bridges. Looking for somewhere to eat on the Quayside?  Try out handy guide here.        

  • The Bigg Market

    The Bigg Market The Bigg Market gets its name from a type of coarse barley, known as Bigg barley, that was widely sold from the stalls in the middle ages when it was the site of a thriving marketplace that formed an important part of the Great North Road.  Nearby St Nicholas’ Cathedral is worth a visit and is over 900 years old.  It contains many references to the city’s history and the people who contributed to it. Newcastle’s Bigg Market is more recently famous for being packed full of pubs, clubs and bars, as well as a range of affordable restaurants and take aways.   Looking for bars and clubs in the Bigg Market?  Try our handy guide. The Bigg Market sometimes gets a bad name for it’s rough and readiness but it can often be overhyped.   A traditional drinking area for many years it may be in need of a little TLC but is still great for a night out.  You won’t find pretentious, modern or trendy bars here but it has some great cheap places to party and is still popular with students. Flares bar is a firm favourite with students for a cheesy night.  A fun bar it definitely does not take itself too seriously, with retro vibe plus 70s-style wallpaper, booth seating and dance floor hung with glitter balls. Looking for places to eat in the Bigg Market?  Try our handy guide.      

  • The Gate

    The Gate The Gate is Newcastle’s premier leisure destination with a host of restaurants, clubs, bars, a state of the art 16 screen Cinema and Aspers Casino. The venue takes its name from Newgate Street on which it stands and is part of the historic Grainger Town area of Newcastle. The Gate is also next to Newcastle’s Chinatown and just up from the Bigg Market.

  • Newcastle Town Wall

    Newcastle Town Wall Newcastle town wall is a medieval defensive wall and Scheduled Ancient Monument. Built during the 13th and 14th centuries it helped protect the town from attack and occupation during times of conflict. During the English Civil War the Scots were able to breach the wall with mines and artillery.   By the mid-18th century the wall had become obsolete and sections were demolished as Newcastle was redeveloped. The most substantial remains are the West Walls by Stowell Street (see marker on map).

  • The Sage

    The Sage Gateshead Sage Gateshead is an international home for music and musical discovery, bringing about a widespread and long-term enrichment of the musical life of the North East of England. Located on the Newcastle Gateshead Quayside, Sage Gateshead is a must see if you’re visiting the region. Easily accessible by both Gateshead and the Millennium Bridge, a pedestrian and cyclist tilt bridge, this landmark building and internationally acclaimed, acoustically perfect music spaces that have become a home and hub for live music and musical discovery in the North East. The Royal Northern Sinfonia, Orchestra of Sage Gateshead, is the UK’s only full-time chamber orchestra and the leading professional orchestra in the North East. Sage Gateshead is proud to have been selected as one of 22 PRS for Music Foundation Talent Development Partners. At Sage Gateshead they offer a dining destination where the innovative menus and own blend coffee enhance your visitor experience.  Overlooking Newcastle Gateshead’s quayside with the accompanying live music on the concourse you can enjoy a delicious array of homemade cakes, afternoon tea and mouth-watering meals. The Sir Michael Straker Café is open from 9am offering a wide range of meals, refreshments and drinks. Closing times vary depending on performances, please call us for more information on 0191 443 4742. Whether you want to book a ticket, plan a visit or simply discover what Sage Gateshead can offer, all the information you need to enjoy your visit can be found here. Ticket Office Hours Ticket Office is open Monday – Sunday from 12noon – 6pm on non-performance days.  On performance days it is open at 12noon up until thirty minutes after the start of the last performance.   On Sundays and Bank holidays phone booking closes at 6pm.  It is possible to book tickets and make donations online 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.   View what’s on and book tickets now. Tickets for classes taking place in The Greggs Children’s Room before 12noon can be purchased from Welcome Desk. At weekends tickets are available from Welcome Desk 20 minutes before the start of the session. Welcome Desk Opening Hours Monday to Friday: 9am – 4pm Weekends: Closed During opening hours, Welcome Desk can be contacted on 0191 443 4666. Building Opening Hours Sage Gateshead is open from 9am, 7 days a week unless otherwise stated.  Building closing times vary.  On performance days the building will remain open for up to an hour after the performance finishes.  On non-performance days the building will close 30 minutes after the last workshop has started.  Please note these times may change, please call welcome desk on 0191 443 4666 to confirm.
  Last entry to the building is 30 minutes before it closes.      

  • Shipley Art Gallery

    Shipley Art Gallery The Shipley Art Gallery is the North East’s leading gallery for contemporary art and design and has one of the best collections of ceramics, wood, metal, glass, textiles and furniture outside of London.   It is also home to William Irving’s painting The Blaydon Races.  The Shipley’s permanent exhibitions include: – the Designs for Life gallery, a showcase featuring more than 300 objects made over the past 2,000 years. – the Saltwell Park Museum, a display of objects from the old Saltwell Park Museum – stories of Gateshead through the ages. Other gallery spaces show a range of exhibitions throughout the year. There are regular events including artist and curator talks, ‘Get Crafty’ family activity days, concerts and fairs. Public transport The gallery can be easily reached by public transport. Take bus number 21, 22, 23, 24 or Q1, Q2 from Haymarket Bus Station Newcastle or from Gateshead Interchange (Bus and Metro). By Car With free parking just outside the door, we’re easy to find on Prince Consort Road, near Gateshead Central Library. For travel information call Traveline on 0871 200 22 33    

  • The Biscuit Factory

    The Biscuit Factory Art Gallery The Biscuit Factory is the UK’s largest independent contemporary art, craft & design gallery set in the heart of Newcastle’s cultural quarter.  Housed in a former Victorian warehouse, our beautiful gallery spaces are set over two floors, displaying a range of exciting contemporary fine art, sculpture, original prints and jewellery, quality craftsmanship and design led homewares. The Biscuit Factory hosts four major exhibitions a year, representing the work of around 250 artists each season, so there is always something new to see every time you visit.  Buying art is a personal experience and whether you are a seasoned collector or a first time buyer our professional and friendly team are here to assist you with your choices and with the interest free Own Art purchase scheme, buying art is simple and affordable. Free Admission 5 minutes from Newcastle city centre Open 7 days a week Artist studios Cafe Restaurant  

  • Baltic Centre for Contemporary Arts

    Baltic Centre for Contemporary Arts Housed in a landmark industrial building on the south bank of the River Tyne in Gateshead.  Opened in 2002 in a converted flour mill it is located alongside the Gateshead Millennium Bridge in Gateshead. The BALTIC aim to present a dynamic, diverse and international programme of contemporary visual art, with an ever-changing calendar of exhibitions and activities designed to give a unique and compelling insight into contemporary artistic practice. Exhibitions / Library / Shop / Food & Drink FREE ENTRY Information can be found at www.balticmill.com   Six restaurant SIX is the Baltic’s stunning rooftop restaurant, serving sustainable local food with breathtaking panoramic views. Brought to you by Fresh Element, the style of food is British modern cuisine featuring the very best ingredients simply cooked and served in a relaxed and friendly setting. RESERVATIONS Monday Dinner  17:30 – 21:30 Drinks  17:30 – 22:00 Tuesday – Saturday Lunch  12:00 – 14:00 Afternoon Tea  14:30 – 15:30 Dinner  17:30 – 21:30 Drinks  12:00 – 22:00 Sunday Lunch  12:00 – 14:00 Afternoon Tea  14:30 – 15:30 Drinks  12:00 – 16:00 Contact on 0191 440 4948 (from 10am daily) Or at eat@sixbaltic.com   Public transport Nearest bus route: Quay link (south shore road) Nearest Metro: Gateshead Interchange or Newcastle Monument Nearest train station: Central Station, Newcastle.    

  • Globe Gallery

    Globe Gallery Set up in 1995 Globe Gallery is a Not for Profit organisation.  They have a long history of working with regional, national and international artists.  Their aim is tobring contemporary art to as wide an audience as possible, support artists through exhibition opportunities, provide volunteers with a great learning experience and work closely with our community to encourage greater participation in the arts. They blend high standards of artistic presentation, an integrated volunteering programme and a firm commitment to the development of emerging and established artists to produce powerful experiences for all participants.  The organisation has a strong history of great exhibitions, artist and audience development, and community participation at its core.   It has well-developed volunteer and emerging artist support systems as well as multiple evaluation mechanisms in place to ensure individualised and mutually beneficial involvement at every level.  Working with contemporary art and artists has helped people from a diverse range of backgrounds gain confidence, improve skills and increase employability, and most importantly enjoy themselves. Their diversity of audience and income streams creates a genuinely twenty-first century grassroots approach to contemporary arts delivery, providing excellent value for artists, audiences, participants, funders, partners, sponsors and supporters.

  • Hatton Gallery

    Hatton Gallery Described in recent years as “One of the most impressive exhibition spaces in Britain“, Newcastle University’s Hatton Gallery, situated in the old quadrangle, has been at the heart of cultural life in the North East since the early twentieth century. Undergoing a £3.8 million redevelopment, the gallery re-opens in September 2017, it will be a vibrant and modern exhibition space bringing about a new era for art and learning in the city. Gallery improvements will include: conserving the architectural and historical elements of the building whilst modernising the gallery to allow for flexible exhibition facilities; a dedicated multi – purpose learning space;  improved lighting;  a new picture store;  conservation and reinterpretation of Kurt Schwitters’ iconic Merz Barn Wall.  

  • Mushroom Works

    Mushroom Works Mushroom Works houses a diverse group professional artists and crafts people. Everything from furniture makers to jewellers, and print makers to painters, reside within in these four walls. Although not an open gallery they host a range of regular open studios events and exhibitions are a great chance to come and see for yourself what goes on at Mushroom Works.  Please visit their website for more details on upcoming events, classes and workshops. Mushroom Works provides affordable studios to a diverse community of professional artists, designer-makers and crafts people.  The building houses 12 creative people from furniture makers to jewellers, painters to illustrators, potters to product designers and many more.  Mushroom Works gallery showcases work by its studio holders as well as taking part in regular regional events such as The Late Shows and Ouseburn Open Studios.  If you’re a creative-type, Mushroom Works hosts an on-going programme of classes and workshops with life drawing, silver clay jewellery, stone carving, stained glass making, pottery-making and a Saturday children’s art club are all available to join.   Public transport Look for the yellow Quay Link bus, route Q2 will take you almost to the doorstep.

  • Saltwell Park & Towers

    Saltwell Park & Towers Nestling in the heart of Gateshead’s urban centre is Saltwell Park, one of the borough’s hidden gems.  With over two million visitors each year, this tourist attraction is a must for family entertainment. It’s historical and peaceful grounds have earned many awards such as Green Flag and Britain’s Best Park.  Some of its facilities include ornamental and woodland gardens, a boating lake, bowling greens, play areas, a maze, educational centre and of course the stunning Saltwell Towers. It is also well known for it’s annual Fireworks Display.    

  • Prudhoe Castle

    Prudhoe Castle Prudhoe Castle has many a story to tell so a family day out to this Northumberland fortress is truly worthwhile.  Built as part of a series of Norman Castles along the Tyne after the 1066 Norman conquest, Prudhoe was continuously occupied for over nine centuries.  It was originally the home of the Umfravilles but was eventually taken over by the famous Percy family who restored it.  Prudhoe survived two sieges during the 1170s and was the only Northumberland castle to resist the Scots.   Have a picnic and take in the surroundings, browse in the shop or explore the keep, great hall and towered walls enclosing a fine Georgian mansion.

  • Chinatown,Newcastle

    Chinatown Newcastle The Chinatown in Newcastle is located to the west of the city on the edge of the shopping and commercial centre, mostly along Stowell Street. In Chinatown you’ll find more than 20 restaurants from Szechuan, Cantonese, Hong Kong Inspired, Malaysian and Korean Dishes, Karaoke, Casino and pubs, as well as authentic Chinese supermarkets, and all sorts of free events like Chinese New Year and the Mid-Autumn Festival. Chinatown is great for a night out with a huge range of places to eat for all budgets.   St James is easy to find with a handy metro and the towering iconic landmark of Newcastle United St James’ Park.   Chinatown runs mostly along Stowell Street lying within the historic heart of Newcastle.  Stowell Street and one of the few still extant stretches of Newcastle’s old town wall mark the northeast boundary of the district.  At the north end of Stowell Street on St Andrew’s Street is the Chinese arch, facing St James’ Park.  St James & Chinatown – Very popular on match days these bars come in all shapes and sizes from traditional match day pubs like The Strawberry, to huge sports bars like Shark Club geared up for food, drink and evenings of Premier League Football, NFL and Wrestling.  

  • Blue Reef Aquarium

    Blue Reef Aquarium Enjoy close encounters with hundreds of incredible aquatic creatures. Come face to face with everything from adorable Seals and Otters to Clownfish, Seahorses and graceful Stingrays.  Meet the Monkeys and Reptiles in our stunning Amazonian feature and get up close and personal to our playful Sea Lions. A full programme of entertaining talks and feeding displays take place throughout the day.   Directions Follow the A19 taking the A1058 (Coast Road) signposted to Tynemouth.  Follow signs towards “Tynemouth Seafront” Opening Times Open everyday from 10am.   Last Admission 4pm – open until 5pm Shops and Cafe Sit back and relax in the sea view Blue Reef Cafe where you can enjoy a wide selection of drinks, snacks and meals.  For younger families we have high chairs and a microwave for parental use. The Blue Reef Gift Shop is filled with a wide range of marine-themed gifts, souvenirs, educational toys, postcards and posters.   

  • Ocean Beach Pleasure Park

    Ocean Beach Pleasure Park The North East’s Biggest and Best FREE Admission Fun Park. Come and join us for a fun packed day out – whatever your age – you will find something to enjoy. Over 50 Rides, Attractions, Amusement Arcades, Game Stalls, Quasar Arena and Food Outlets you can’t fail to have a great day out. Thrill rides include the Sky Diver, Wave Swinger, Urban Wave, Waltzer, Go Karts, Roller Coaster, Miami Surf, Pirate Ship and Bungee Trampolines.  Opening Times Open from 10am over the Easter weekend until late Various Offers Available Discounts for Groups Birthday Party Packages   Laserforce Laserforce, inside the Quasar Amusements, South Shields is the indoor laser game perfect for kids and adults of all ages.  You can also compete against friends or family in the Laser Maze.  Individually or in a larger group, the Laser Maze is a test of skill, agility and precision. Press the start button, enter the room and make your way to the other end by stepping over and ducking under the red lasers appearing from the side walls.  Each player player starts with 90 seconds and 8000 points. You lose 15 points for every second you take and 150 for every broken beam and there are 3 skill levels to choose from – Easy, Medium or Hard. Alongside all the thrill rides and children’s rides they also have a lot of other indoor and outdoor attractions  at Ocean Beach to ensure the fun lasts even longer.  Everything from arcades packed with officially licensed toys and prizes.  With 12-hole mini golf at Smugglers Cove and Dune’s with ten pin bowling and a huge soft play area there’s something for kids of all ages to enjoy. Urban Wave The Urban Wave is a new all year round sports activity that can simulate popular boarding such as surfing, wake-boarding, body-boarding and snow-boarding without getting wet! This is the only surf simulator of its type in the UK which uses a full rotating platform of soft brushes which gives the rider the ability to carve simple or difficult tricks.  Shaped like a wave, a rotating special surface of 6 meters wide and 9 meters long, gives you enough space to ride and do tricks. The sense of gliding offers beginners an authentic feeling for sports such as surfing, while the experts can try and practice turns, tricks and new moves like in a waterwave.  With especially produced surfboards you can surf standing up, on your knees or lying down. Up to two people can use Urban Wave at the same time.  Using the Urban Wave builds core strength and fitness, whilst improving balance and co-ordination in an exciting and innovative way.  The Urban Wave is suitable for beginners and pros of all ages(over 1.3m) in most weather conditions. After some easy instructions on how to use our especially designed boards, simply jump on and ride without the need to get your clothing changed.  A free medal will be awarded to the “Best Surfer” who can stand up the longest and show the best tricks and turns of the group. read more

  • Newcastle Racecourse

    Newcastle Racecourse The North East’s premier racecourse, located at Gosforth Park a few miles outside Newcastle city centre.  It stages both flat and National Hunt racing, with its biggest meeting being the Northumberland Plate held annually in June. A recent £12m redevelopment of the racecourse gave it an all-weather track and installation of a system of flood lights for night meetings.  Newcastle is the only all-weather racecourse in the country which has a straight mile.  Together with its width this very much means that it is a galloping track. Set on the beautiful High Gosforth Park, Newcastle Racecourse has over 800 acres of land and 33 suites available for hire which all boast fabulous views over the Racecourse and Newcastle City Centre. Newcastle Racecourse is also an all year round venue for: Conferences Meetings Product launches and exhibitions Indoor and outdoor events Training events and team building Dining and banqueting Wedding ceremonies and receptions Private parties and special events